Skip to main content

Silver Sound 4 November 2016: Village People



Today’s guest was author Debbie Young. Debbie has written a number of author guidebooks, including Sell Your Books (SilverWood Books) and Opening Up to Indie Authors for the Alliance of Independent Authors (jointly with Dan Holloway). She has also published two collections of essays, both inspired by life in the Cotswold village of Hawkesbury Upton – All Part of the Charm: A Modern Memoir of Village Life and Young By Name.

In addition Debbie has published a number of short story collections, including the Christmas themed Stocking Fillers. She is now working on the first in a series of murder mystery novels set in an English village not unlike Hawkesbury Upton – except, of course, for the murders!

Debbie has also written the book Coming to Terms With Type 1 Diabetes to raise funds and awareness for the JDRF. JDRF is the largest charitable funder of research into a cure for the disease, which affects both her husband and her daughter.

Amongst her many activities, Debbie is the founder of the Hawkesbury Upton Literary Festival. All events are free and it’s a wonderful chance to enjoy a day in the village and listen to readings and talks. The next festival is on 22 April 2017. For more details see the HULF website.

 
Author Debbie Young at the BCfm Studio
National Memory Day Writing Competition - Debbie’s work is very much based in her local community, and it’s an excellent example of the advice often given to writers to “write what you know”. So if you feel inspired to have a go, or if you are already writing, you might be interested in the National Memory Day writing competition. National Memory Day is an annual celebration of poetry and creative writing for people affected by memory loss, and the first National Memory Day is 18 May 2017. The competition is for poems and short stories, and includes a Best Young Writer Award and Best Primary Carer Voice Award. For details see the National Memory Day website

Diabetes - If you would like more information or advice about diabetes you might find the following links useful:-




You can listen to the show here (10 to 11 am)


Silver Sound is broadcast by BCfm 93.2 fm between 10 am and mid day on Thursdays and Fridays. I’ll be back on the show between 10 and 11 am on 2 December 2016 with another fabulous guest!




Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Dickens and Chickens

On 17 April 1860, in fields near Farnborough, Charles Dickens joined an audience amongst whom were the Prince of Wales and the Prime Minister, Lord Palmerston, as well as a number of MPs and clergymen, to watch the American John Carmel Heenan and England’s Tom Sayers (the Brighton Titch) beat one another blind and bloody in a bare-knuckle fight that lasted nearly two and a half hours. The fight ended in a draw when Aldershot police stormed the ring, forcing the fighters and their illustrious spectators to flee the scene. It was the brutality of this match that signalled an end to the bare-knuckle era and prompted the development of the Marquess of Queensberry’s rules. Dickens’s interest in pugilism was of long standing. In 1848 Dombey and Son , which had been published in serial form over the preceding two years, came out in book form. One of many of his novels that draws on the world of the prize fighter, it introduces the unforgettable Mr Toots, a would-be man about town, an

Spotlight On...Begbrook House, Frenchay, Bristol

On 11 November 1913, the head gardener at Begbrook House in Frenchay near Bristol discovered that the   building was on fire. The house stood in its own wooded grounds, and was said to have twenty rooms and a fine old staircase. Within a few hours the house was gutted. The fire caused £3,000 worth of damage. A copy of the WSPU newspaper, The Suffragette , was left at the site with the message, “Birrell is coming. Rachel Pease is still being tortured”.  Begbrook House Picture: Frenchay Village Museum Augustine Birrell was the Liberal MP for Bristol North, and a cabinet minister. He was frequently targetted by militants in Bristol. Suffragettes interrupted his meetings and two women once accosted him at Temple Meads Railway Station with their demand for the vote.    Begbrook House belonged to Hugh Thomas Coles, a wealthy banker. Hugh Coles was the son of   William Gale Cole of Clifton, who was also a banker, and was born in Clifton in 1856. Lik

Authors Alison Morton and Helen Hollick in Conversation

Alison Morton, author of the stunning alternative history Roma Nova series, and Helen Hollick, whose historical fiction ranges across the centuries from King Arthur to pirates of the Caribbean, have both taken exciting steps into new genres. I recently eavesdropped on them in conversation during their current Blog Tour, talking about the challenges and rewards of moving in new directions...   Thank you, Lucienne, for hosting a stop on our joint tour for our new released mystery/thriller novels Double Identity by Alison Morton and A Mirror Murder by Helen Hollick. Helen: It was quite coincidental that we both decided to branch out from our usual genres into mystery/thrillers at more or less the same time, wasn’t it Alison? My A Mirror Murder is a novella ‘cosy mystery’, while your, Double Identity is a fast-paced thriller. What they have in common is the theme of investigating a murder. Alison: I wanted to write a character with strong roots in France, which is where I live. Ma